At Anthony Collins Solicitors, we understand there are significant factors that may impact on the way in which legal services should be provided for the older client. We never make assumptions about a client’s legal needs simply based on their age. However, any of the following factors can increase the level of risk faced by a client, highlighting the need for bespoke advice from an experienced and independent solicitor:

  • The importance of the proposed action, eg  the person is thinking about making a substantial lifetime gift or making their will.
  • The impact any decision made now may have on the person’s future standard of living.
  • A decision to hand over substantial over control to another person, for example, when making a lasting power of attorney.
  • Possible limitations on the person’s ability to increase their income or capital reserves in the future – what they have now has to “last the course”.
  • Health issues that may cause the person to rely more heavily on others and so make the person vulnerable to undue influence or pressure.

Sheree Green, Regional Chair for Solicitors for the Elderly, was delighted to be invited to share her expertise in this area by contributing two key chapters to this new handbook; namely “Acting for the Elderly Client” and “Capacity and Best Interests Decision making”.

For more information

If you or an older family member need specialist legal advice in relation to a specific matter, or more widely in relation to organising your affairs, please contact Sheree Green.

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