We have developed a useful and accessible toolkit to help you to manage your intellectual property. It includes important elements of your branding, such as logos, and the rights in the written materials you produce including the information that you publish on your website.

If managed properly, your charity’s intellectual property can make you stand out from the crowd and can even generate additional income if licensed to third parties. Too often little, or no, thought is given to intellectual property despite the obligation on trustees to protect their charity’s assets.

Our toolkit:

  • explains the different types of intellectual property that you may own, or wish to own;
  • provides guidance on how to protect your intellectual property and tips to help you avoid infringing other people’s;
  • gives charity-specific examples of best practice and recent cases involving charities that have reached the Courts;
  • includes a number of template documents that you can use for managing your intellectual property such as copyright notices, IP licences and assignments.

The toolkit is priced at £250 plus VAT and will enable your trustees and senior management to effectively make the most of this important asset.

For more information

Please contact Rebecca Ward or Sarah Webb.

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